Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend World Congress on Regulations of Nanotechnology Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Day 1 :

OMICS International Nanoregulations 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Shaker A Mousa photo
Biography:

Shaker A Mousa has finished PhD from Ohio State University, College of Medicine, Columbus, OH and Post-doctoral Fellowship from University of Kentucky, Lexington KY. He also received his MBA from Widener University, Chester, PA. He is currently an endowed tenure Professor and Executive Vice President and Chairman of the Pharmaceutical Research Institute and Vice Provost for Research at ACPHS. Prior to his academic career, he was a Senior Scientist and fellow at The DuPont Pharmaceutical Company for 17 years where he contributed to the discovery and development of several FDA approved and globally marketed diagnostics and therapeutics. He holds over 350 US and international patents discovering novel anti-angiogenesis strategies, antithrombotics, anti-integrins, anti-cancer, and non-invasive diagnostic imaging approaches employing various nanotechnology platforms. He has published more than 1,000 journal articles, book chapters, published patents, and books as editor and author. He is a Member of several NIH study sections, and the Editorial Board of several high impact journals. His research has focused on diagnostics and therapeutics of angiogenesis-related disorders, thrombosis, vascular and cardiovascular diseases.

Abstract:

Over the past few years, evidence from the scientific and medical communities has demonstrated that nanotechnology and nanomedicine have tremendous potential to profoundly impact numerous aspects of cancer and other disorders in term of early diagnosis and targeted therapy. The objective of this study is to highlight the role of nanobiotechnology and other enabling technologies in the followings: Nano synthesis and assembly of various platforms for targeted delivery, improved PK and PD, early detection (imaging) and nanobiotechnology in shortening the time and risk of drug discovery and development. The utilization of nanotechnology for the development of new nano-carrier systems has the potential to offer improved chemotherapeutic delivery through increased solubility and sustained retention. One of the major advantages of this cutting edge technology is its unique multifunctional characteristics. Targeted delivery of drug incorporated nanoparticles, through conjugation of tumor-specific cell surface markers, such as tumor-specific antibodies or ligands, which can enhance the efficacy of the anticancer drug and reduce the side effects. Additionally, multifunctional characteristics of the nano-carrier system would allow for simultaneous imaging of tumor mass, targeted drug delivery and monitoring (Theranostics). A summary of recent progress in nanotechnology as it relates specifically to nanoparticles and anticancer drug delivery will be reviewed. Nano nutraceuticals using combination of various natural products provide a great potential in diseases prevention. Additionally, various nanomedicine approaches for the detection and treatment of various types of organ specific delivery, vascular targeting, and vaccine will be briefly discussed.

OMICS International Nanoregulations 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Gerd Kaupp photo
Biography:

Gerd Kaupp has studied Chemistry at the University of Würzburg, Germany and had Post-doctoral appointments at Ames, Iowa, Lausanne, and Freiburg i. Br, where he became appointed as Associate Professor. From there, he was appointed as full Professor at the University of Oldenburg in 1982. He guided a successful research group with various projects and cooperation with numerous industries and worldwide academic research groups. He has served as Guest Professor for three international universities. He is now a Retired Member at the University of Oldenburg and pursues his scientific interests also with consulting. His expertise is in chemical kinetics, laser photochemistry, waste-free benign syntheses and productions, solid-state chemistry, reactive milling, mechanochemistry, atomic force microscopy AFM, scanning near-field optical microscopy SNOM, nanoscratching, nanoindentation, standardization in nanomechanics, and bionics. He is serving as keynote speaker in these fields, published numerous scientific papers and books and is inventor of patents in solid-state and environmental chemistry.

Abstract:

One of the most used and versatile techniques for (nano)mechanics is the indentation with pyramidal/conical diamond tips. ISO-14577 defines and iterates hardness (HISO) and elastic modulus (ErISO) with respect to projected contact area (Ahc= consthc2) with (nearly) legal character. This has been widely accepted since half a century, as it seems to support the Sneddon normal force (FN) proportionality with h2 hypothesis, which however has been disproved experimentally. And the proportionality with h3/2 is physically founded. The wrong exponent 2 on h has not only been used for the unphysical deduction of most mechanical parameters but, unlike FN=kh3/2 plots since 1990 (where k is the material's penetration resistance), it cannot detect frequent phase-transformation in the loading curve, so that numerous unloading curve iterations from FNmax do not characterize pristine material. Even worse, these ISO standards violate the first energy law, because the concomitant shear-force work and thus not all of FNmax "arrives" at the projected area (published since 2012). The physically valid HPHYS can now be obtained by linear regression of the loading curve's FN=kh3/2 plots (ErPHYS requires additionally stiffness) and depth correction, omitting iterations with simplest arithmetic. It is thus valid for all types of materials and all instrumental indentation techniques. The dilemma of the ISO standards against physics and thus the enforced calculation of wrong mechanical properties is detrimental, producing very large errors (exponential size dependence!) and liability problems in case of materials failure. Textbooks and instrument software must be rewritten, ISO-14577, a NIST tutorial and numerous publications must be retracted. The physical correctness must be installed for the sake of daily life security. Examples will be discussed. ISO appears slow in changing its standards for complying with physics. They are asked to release an urgent caveat, telling that ISO-14577 will be subject to redefinitions for physical reasons.